The Women's Innovation Fund 2018


This exclusive panel event ‘Women as Breadwinners: Holding the purse strings as well as the baby’ will establish the connectivity between female entrepreneurs here in Ireland with women across the developing world who are changing the power structure through ingenuity, starting micro-businesses to break the cycle of poverty, with support from Plan International Ireland.

WHEN PEOPLE AND IDEAS COME TOGETHER, WONDERFUL THINGS HAPPEN.

Through the provision of hands-on training across a range of technical and business skills, Plan International Ireland’s Women’s Innovation Fund has replicated the successes made here at home across the developing world, by training and supporting women, thus achieving real business results.

SPECIAL GUESTS

Trish Long, MD Disney Ireland

Caroline Keeling, CEO Keelings

Oonagh O’Hagan, CEO Meaghers Pharmacy

Carol Lambert, Creative Director, Publicis D

Emily Logan, Chief Commissioner of Irish Human Rights and Equality.

with

MC – Shona Murray, Journalist

To secure your place please RSVP to Emily Barton by Monday 21st May. Places are limited and on first come first served basis.


In addition to the obvious benefits of being able to save or receive funds and develop businesses, women’s access to enterprise has important long-term social outcomes. Access to enterprise gives women a new-found confidence with many becoming leaders in their community. Women also increase their purchasing power, obtaining goods formerly owned only by men, and enhance their level of decision-making power within the household and wider community.

The wider target group for the VSLAs is vulnerable women living in poverty. Beneficiaries include farmers, head of households, widows of war, and adolescent girls. The VSLA model equips women to train other women in their own communities, negating prohibitive transport costs and time away from children and family.

Women as influencers: Not only do women in micro-enterprise gain stronger positioning within their communities, they serve as influencers to other women and girls in the wider community. This translates into more women in VSLA groups starting the process, more women trained and as a direct result, more children, especially girls, in education.